vass: Jon Stewart reading a dictionary (books)
Vass ([personal profile] vass) wrote2014-02-19 02:15 am
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Perfume review: Chanel Sycomore (Les Exclusifs)


Last perfume from the batch that arrived in the first week of February. There was meant to be one more, but it's either coming separately or was accidentally left out - I've written to the vendor asking for clarification on that.

So, this one's supposed to smell like woods and smoke and vetiver. 'Nutty' vetiver, even, and I can sort of see what they mean by that.

I think I can now identify vetiver reliably. I think. It's not the note I would call 'green', it's the note I would call 'sharp'.

I can smell the smoke too, and it's lingering in the back of my throat even as I type this.

Also the wood. I like wood notes in perfume, but there is one (or more) that makes me headachy, and I don't know which, but it's in here. A sort of wood+powder combo that makes me think of perfume counters. (That might be the pink pepper.)

Which is a shame, because I can understand just enough about perfumes to be able to tell that this one would tell a story, if I knew enough to be able to read it, and if I could sit with it long enough.

It is also very elegant. Dressy without being overpowering or overformal.

Whatever note is bothering me, it does get less over time. Then the wood gets stronger. This perfume is unisex, but like 'Pour Une Homme' it registers as 'old woman' to me. A different woman from 'Pour Une Homme'. This one is that lady at the arts foundation that you have to be nice to because she could end you, and you have a wary respect for her competence and adroitness, but don't really like her, although she's never mean - that would be tacky, and nothing she does is at all tacky. She's just very invested in keeping things as they are, because that arrangement suits her, and she doesn't care if it doesn't suit the people currently excluded by it, or if the organisation's membership is dying from old age and it can't attract young people for some mysterious reason. She would wear Chanel. Uncompromising. She last expressed any vulnerability when she was six. Surprisingly, she likes you.

I guess it did tell me a story. Huh.

Later on in the drydown, the vetiver becomes almost elegiac. Much later on, when it's just the wood basenotes, it's smooth and well-sanded and lovely (but still not me.)
rydra_wong: Lee Miller photo showing two women wearing metal fire masks in England during WWII. (Default)

[personal profile] rydra_wong 2014-02-18 06:41 pm (UTC)(link)
A sort of wood+powder combo that makes me think of perfume counters.

Is it the same as the note that messed you up in Terre d'Hermes, do you think?

This one is that lady at the arts foundation that you have to be nice to because she could end you, and you have a wary respect for her competence and adroitness, but don't really like her, although she's never mean - that would be tacky, and nothing she does is at all tacky. She's just very invested in keeping things as they are, because that arrangement suits her, and she doesn't care if it doesn't suit the people currently excluded by it, or if the organisation's membership is dying from old age and it can't attract young people for some mysterious reason. She would wear Chanel. Uncompromising. She last expressed any vulnerability when she was six. Surprisingly, she likes you.

*is quite dead from delight at this description*
teaotter: a blonde woman sings into an old-fashioned microphone on a dark stage (Default)

[personal profile] teaotter 2014-02-23 12:06 am (UTC)(link)
Your description of this one is hilarious. From the notes, I'm surprised at how many people smell "powder" in this, but I'm not familiar with pink pepper.